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Governance

Safe or Sorry? Prospects for Britons in the European Union after Brexit debt

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Safe or Sorry? Prospects for Britons in the European Union after Brexit debt

Following the 2016 referendum that saw a slim majority of UK voters opt to leave the European Union, and with exit negotiations in full swing, approximately 1 million UK citizens living in another EU Member State face an uncertain future. This report—part of MPI Europe’s ongoing examination of what Brexit means for mobile EU and UK nationals—sketches a profile of the Britons living abroad in Europe and assesses their prospects in the years to come. >


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.

 

Beyond Teaching English: Supporting High School Completion by Immigrant and Refugee Students debt

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Beyond Teaching English: Supporting High School Completion by Immigrant and Refugee Students debt

Immigrant and refugee youth who enter the United States during their secondary school years face a daunting set of challenges. In addition to learning a new language and adjusting to U.S. classroom norms, they must quickly fill gaps in their subject-matter knowledge and pass the courses required to graduate high school before aging out of the system. For some, the pressure to go from limited literacy to a high school diploma in a few years can be overwhelming. The supports these newcomers receive—either directly in schools and through the community-based organizations with which districts partner—have the power to shape these students' future educational and career trajectories. >


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.

 

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States debt


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A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States debt

Repeat migration is slowing significantly for Mexican adults removed from the United States. An official survey of Mexican adults removed or voluntarily returned by the U.S. government found an 80 percent drop in the number intending to seek re-entry, from 471,000 in 2005 to 95,000 in 2015. Overall, the share of Mexican returnees saying they intended to return to the United States fell from 95 percent in 2005 to 49 percent in 2015. >


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States debt


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A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States debt

Repeat migration is slowing significantly for Mexican adults removed from the United States. An official survey of Mexican adults removed or voluntarily returned by the U.S. government found an 80 percent drop in the number intending to seek re-entry, from 471,000 in 2005 to 95,000 in 2015. Overall, the share of Mexican returnees saying they intended to return to the United States fell from 95 percent in 2005 to 49 percent in 2015. >


By Migration Policy Institute, , USA.


Governance Policy Resource.